Last modified on 17 July 2013, at 21:59

Mizo proverbs

This page is for proverbs from the Mizo language, the official language in the Indian state of Mizoram.

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  • A ṭha lam kawng a chho va, a chhe lam kawng a phei.
    • Literal: The right path is very steep upward, whereas the wrong path is horizontal.
    • Meaning: Used to say that good things are hard to achieve, and hence easily obtained riches are worthless.
    • Source: C. Saizawna, Pipute ṭawngkauchheh and M.D. Muthukumaraswamy, Folklore as a Discourse, Univ. of Madras, Dept. of Anthropology, National Folklore Support Center (India).
  • Kawi pawh a kawm a ṭhat chuan a rah pawh a ṭha, a kawm a chhiat chuan a rah pawh a chhia.
    • Literal: If the shell of Kawi is good, the nut it bears is also good; if the shell is not good, the nut inside is also poor. (Kawi is a large been-like seed or nut.)
    • Source: C. Saizawna, Pipute ṭawngkauchheh and M.D. Muthukumaraswamy, Folklore as a Discourse, Univ. of Madras, Dept. of Anthropology, National Folklore Support Center (India).
  • Lungpui pawh lungtëin a kamki loh chuan a awm thei lo.
    • Literal: Without the support of small pebbles, a big rock cannot be stable.
    • Source: C. Saizawna, Pipute ṭawngkauchheh and M.D. Muthukumaraswamy, Folklore as a Discourse, Univ. of Madras, Dept. of Anthropology, National Folklore Support Center (India).
  • Mihring hmelma lian ber chu mahni.
    • Literal: The main foe of man is himself.
    • Source: C. Saizawna, Pipute ṭawngkauchheh and M.D. Muthukumaraswamy, Folklore as a Discourse, Univ. of Madras, Dept. of Anthropology, National Folklore Support Center (India).
  • Se bo hnua se kawng khàr ang.
    • Literal: To close the gate of the bull pen after the bull has escaped is foolishness.
    • English equivalent: Prevention is better than cure.
    • Source: C. Saizawna, Pipute ṭawngkauchheh and M.D. Muthukumaraswamy, Folklore as a Discourse, Univ. of Madras, Dept. of Anthropology, National Folklore Support Center (India).
  • Vawiina tih tùr naktûka tihah khêk suh.
    • Literal/Meaning: Do not put off till tomorrow what you can do today.
    • Source: C. Saizawna, Pipute ṭawngkauchheh and M.D. Muthukumaraswamy, Folklore as a Discourse, Univ. of Madras, Dept. of Anthropology, National Folklore Support Center (India).