Last modified on 13 November 2013, at 09:13

Mansfield Park (novel)

Mansfield Park (written between 1812 and 1814; Published July 1814) is a novel by Jane Austen.

  • Depend upon it, you see but half. You see the evil, but you do not see the consolation. There will be little rubs and disappointments everywhere, and we are all apt to expect too much; but then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere— and those evil-minded observers, dearest Mary, who make much of a little, are more taken in and deceived than the parties themselves.
  • Everybody likes to go their own way— to choose their own time and manner of devotion.
  • I cannot think well of a man who sports with any woman's feelings; and there may often be a great deal more suffered than a stander-by can judge of.
  • "I pay very little regard," said Mrs. Grant, "to what any young person says on the subject of marriage. If they profess a disinclination for it, I only set it down that they have not yet seen the right person."
  • How wonderful, how very wonderful the operations of time, and the changes of the human mind!
  • If any one faculty of our nature may be called more wonderful than the rest, I do think it is memory. There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities of memory, than in any other of our intelligences. The memory is sometimes so retentive, so serviceable, so obedient; at others, so bewildered and so weak; and at others again, so tyrannic, so beyond control! We are, to be sure, a miracle every way; but our powers of recollecting and of forgetting do seem peculiarly past finding out.
  • It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.
  • Nothing amuses me more than the easy manner with which everybody settles the abundance of those who have a great deal less than themselves.
  • Oh! do not attack me with your watch. A watch is always too fast or too slow. I cannot be dictated to by a watch.
  • One cannot fix one's eyes on the commonest natural production without finding food for a rambling fancy.
  • Selfishness must always be forgiven, you know, because there is no hope of a cure.
  • The enthusiasm of a woman's love is even beyond the biographer's.
  • The gentleness, modesty, and sweetness of her character were warmly expatiated on; that sweetness which makes so essential a part of every woman's worth in the judgment of man, that though he sometimes loves where it is not, he can never believe it absent.
  • There is nothing like employment, active indispensable employment, for relieving sorrow. Employment, even melancholy, may dispel melancholy, and her occupations were hopeful.
  • We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.
  • Where any one body of educated men, of whatever denomination, are condemned indiscriminately, there must be a deficiency of information, or...of something else.
  • Her eye fell everywhere on lawns and plantations of the freshest green; and the trees, though not fully clothed, were in that delightful state when farther beauty is known to be at hand, and when, while much is actually given to the sight, more yet remains for the imagination. Chapter 46

External linksEdit

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:
Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to: