Last modified on 23 February 2014, at 16:36

Maltese proverbs

Proverbs from all Maltese speaking parts of the world.

BEdit

  • Bidu tajjeb, nofs ix-xogħol.
    • English equivalent: Well begun, is half done.
    • Meaning: "Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

GEdit

  • Ġebel ma' ģebel ma jiltaqa', izda wiċċ jiltaqa'.
    • Translation: Stones do not meet stones, but a face meets another face.
    • English equivalent: A mountain never meets a mountain, but a man meets a man.
    • Meaning: "There are some things/events that are impossible, like an encounter of mountains, but there is always a chance for people to meet. or Once can always find a possibility for revenge."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 213. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

IEdit

  • Il-ħuta l-kbira tiekol iż-żgira.
    • Translation: The big fish eat the small ones.
    • English equivalent: Men are like fish; the great ones devour the small.
    • Meaning: "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Iż-żmien għaziz u ma jinxtarax.
    • Translation: Time is precious and cannot be bought.
    • English equivalent: Time is precious.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 428. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

KEdit

  • Kulhadd jahbi t-travu tieghu u jara t-traba f'ghajn haddiehor.
    • English equivalent: You see the splinter in another's eye but fail to see the beam in your own.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 131. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

MEdit

  • Meta jorqod il-qaattus, il-ġrieden joħorġu.
    • Translation: When the cat is not at home, the mice are free.
    • English equivalent: If the cat is away, the mice play.
    • Meaning: "In the absence of the person in authority those under his control will often neglect the duties/rules imposed on them."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Martin H. Manser (2007). "17". The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 114. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 8 September 2013. 
  • Min ma jaħdemx ma jikolx.
    • Translation: He who does not work shall not eat.
    • English equivalent: He that will not work, shall not eat.
    • Meaning: "Without due effort one is not entitled to the fruits of the work."
    • Source for proverb and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 256. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Minn vaħda dieħel u minn oħra ħiereġ.
    • Translation: In at one ear and out at the other.
    • English equivalent: Advice most needed are the least heeded.
    • Meaning: "For various reasons a good advice or a genuine warning is often disregarded or considered of no importance."
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 179. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.