Last modified on 7 July 2014, at 05:51

Lithuanian proverbs

Lithuanian proverbs are short expressions of popular wisdom from Lithuania.

DEdit

  • Dievas davė dantis, Dievas duos ir duonos.
    • Translation: God gave teeth, God will provide the bread.
    • English equivalent: Each day brings it own bread.
    • Meaning: Try not to worry so much about the future.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 757. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Drumstame vandeny bepigu žuvauti.
    • Translation: It is good fishing in streamy water.
    • English equivalent: It is good fishing in troubled waters.
    • Meaning: "In taking advantage of chaotic conditions one can easily serve one's own purposes."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 391. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

GEdit

  • Gera pradžia — pusė darbo.'
    • English equivalent: Well begun, is half done.
    • Meaning: Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

KEdit

  • Kaip senieji giedojo, taip jaunieji dainuoja.
    • English equivalent: "Just as one calls into the forest, so it echoes back."
    • Meaning: Do not expect friendly reply when being obnoxious.
    • Meaning: Bad language may have other causes than innate bad character.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Kaip senieji giedojo, taip jaunieji dainuoja.
    • Translation: What kind of parents, such children.
    • Meaning: Children will become like older generations.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Kam niežti, tas kasos.
    • Translation: To whom it itches, scratches it.
    • English equivalent: If the shoe fits, wear it.
    • Meaning: "If it seems that a critical remark applies to you, then you must accept it."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Manser, Martin H. (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 136. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 998. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kas nedirba, tas nevalgo.
    • Translation: He who does not want to work, that cannot eat either.
    • English equivalent: He that will not work, shall not eat.
    • Meaning: Without due effort one is not entitled to the fruits of the work.
    • Source for proverb and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 256. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Katė glostoma kuprą kelią.
    • Translation: Cat patting leads to hump raising.
    • English equivalent: The more you stroke the cat's tail, the more he raises his back.
    • Meaning: Displaying too much affection or desperation repels your friends and love interests.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1184. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Koks tėvas, toks ir sūnus.
    • Translation: Such father, such son.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

LEdit

  • Lašas po lašo ir akmenį pratašo.
    • English equivalent: Constant dropping wears the stone.
    • "A drop hollows out the stone by falling not twice, but many times; so too is a person made wise by reading not two, but many books."
    • (Giordano Bruno, Il Candelaio)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Liga raita atjoja, pėščia išeina.
    • English equivalent: "Misfortune comes on horseback and goes away on foot.”
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 65. ISBN 0415096243. 

MEdit

  • Meška girioje, o skūrą jau rėžia.
    • English equivalent: Don't sell the skin till you have caught the bear.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 641. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Mieruok tris kartus, kirpk vieną kartą.
    • English equivalent: Measure thrice, cut once.
    • Meaning: One should always act only after due consideration. A hasty action may involve an improper consideration of important aspects.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

NEdit

  • Ne viskas auksas, kas auksu žėri.
    • English equivalent: All that glimmers is not gold.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 89. ISBN 0415160502. 

OEdit

  • Obuolys nuo obels netoli krenta.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

SEdit

  • Sena meilė nerūdyja
    • Translation: An old love does not rust.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 825. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Šiaučius be batụ, kriaučius be apsiausto.
    • Translation: The shoemaker is always barefooted.
    • English equivalent: The shoemaker goes barefoot.
    • Meaning: "Working hard for others one may neglect one's own needs or the needs of those closest to him."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "7". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Svetimi dūmai akis graužia .
    • English equivalent: Dry bread at home is better than roast meat abroad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 754. ISBN 0415096243. 

TEdit

  • Tylejimas - sutikimas.
    • "Those who do not reply to a request or accusation, or who raise no objection to something said or done, are assumed to have acquiesced."
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 244. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "94". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 430. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

VEdit

  • Varna varnui akies nekirs .
    • English equivalent: Crows do not pick out crows' eyes.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 31. ISBN 0415160502. 

ŽEdit

  • Žuvis žuvi (gaudo ir) ryja.
    • English equivalent: Men are like fish; the great ones devour the small.
    • Meaning: "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.