Last modified on 12 March 2014, at 17:56

Latvian proverbs

Latvian proverbs are short expressions of popular wisdom from Latvia.

AEdit

  • Ābols no ābeles tālu nekrīt.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Aiz kokiem neredzēt mežu.
    • Translation: Cannot see woods behind the trees
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 160. ISBN 0415160502. 

CEdit

  • Ceļš uz elli ir bruģēts ar labiem nodomiem.
    • Translation: The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 257. ISBN 0415160502. 

DEdit

  • Dievam trīs lietas patīkamas.
    • English equivalent: All good things are three.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 80. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Divus zaķus reizē ķerdams nevienu nenoķersi.
    • English equivalent: You must not run after two hares at the same time.
    • Meaning: "Concentrate on one thing at a time or you will achieve nothing. - Trying to do two or more things at a time, when even one on its own needs full effort, means that none of them will be accomplished properly."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "X". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. X. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 886. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dumš tas putns, kam sava lizda nav mīļa.
    • English equivalent: It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest; Don't wash your dirty linen in public.
    • Meaning: Don't speak ill off yourself and the groups you belong to.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 466. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Dzirdi dauds, runa maz.
    • English equivalent: God gave us two ears and one mouth.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 160. ISBN 0415160502. 

IEdit

  • Iedosi velnam mazo pirkstiņu, paņems visu roku.
    • English equivalent: Give him an inch and he will take a yard.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 240. ISBN 0415160502. 

KEdit

  • Kas nestrādā, tam nebūs ēst.
    • English equivalent: He that will not work, shall not eat.
    • Meaning: "Without due effort one is not entitled to the fruits of the work."
    • Source for proverb and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 256. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kas skroderarm dos labas drēbes!
    • English equivalent: The shoemaker goes barefoot.
    • Meaning: "Working hard for others one may neglect one's own needs or the needs of those closest to him."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "7". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kā viss dzīvē neatgadās
    • English equivalent: Never is a long time.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 36. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kā vecie svilpo tā jaunie danco.
    • Translation: The young ones dance as the old ones whistle.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Kā sauc, tā atskan.
    • English equivalent: Just as one calls into the forest, so it echoes back.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Kāda māte, tāda meita.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: "Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kāds tēvs, tāds dēls.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: "Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kam niez, tas kasās
    • English equivalent: If the shoe fits, wear it.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 998. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kur divi, tur trešais lieks.
    • English equivalent: Two is a crowd, but three is a company.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 729. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kur tievs, tur trūkst.
    • English equivalent: A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
    • Meaning: "A weak part or member will affect the success or effectiveness of the whole."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 38. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 31 July 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 19. ISBN 0415160502. 

LEdit

  • Labāk godīgi mirt, nekā negodīgi dzīvot.
    • English equivalent: Death before dishonour.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 54. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Laiks ir nauda.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1008. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lielā zivs mazo rij.
    • English equivalent: Men are like fish; the great ones devour the small.
    • Meaning: "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Source for proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

NEdit

  • Ne viss ir zelts, kas spīd.
    • English equivalent: All that glimmers is not gold.
    • Meaning: "An attractive appearance may be deceptive. It may cover or hide a much less favourable content."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: # Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "X". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 114. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 77. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • No tukšām runām (valodām) vēders pilnāks netiek.
    • English equivalent: Fine words butters no parsnips.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. IOI. ISBN 0415096243. 

PEdit

  • Pulkā pat mirt nav grūti.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415160502. 

SEdit

  • Sargi savu godu no jaunām dienām.
    • English equivalent: Reckless youth makes rueful age.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1151. ISBN 0415096243. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1122. ISBN 0415096243. 


  • Sargi sevi pats, tad Dievs tevi sargās.
    • English equivalent: Heaven helps those who help themselves.
    • Meaning: "When in trouble first of all every one himself should do his best to improve his condition."
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 150. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 733. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Sveši dūmi acis grauž.
    • English equivalent: Dry bread at home is better than roast meat abroad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 754. ISBN 0415096243. 

VEdit

  • Vārna vārnai acī neknābj.
    • Translation: A crow will not pick out the eyes of another crow.
    • English equivalent: Dog doesn't eat dog.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 31. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Veca mīlestība nerūs.
    • Translation: Old love does not rust.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 825. ISBN 0415096243. 

ZEdit

  • Zirgam četras kājas ir tad vēl klūp.
    • English equivalent: A good marksman may miss.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 57. ISBN 0415160502. 

See alsoEdit