Korean proverbs

Proverbs from all Korean speaking parts of the world.

AEdit

  • 아는 길도 물어가라
    • Transliteration: Aneun gildo muleogara.
    • Translation: Even if you know the way, ask one more time.
    • Meaning: Do not be overconfident and assume that you know anything perfectly well. There are always unknown or unexpected details.
    • 왕문용 (20 August 2008). 국어 와 의사 소통. 한국 문화사. p. 118. 

BEdit

  • 빈 수레가 요란하다
    • Transliteration: Bin surega yoranhada.
    • Translation: An empty cart rattles loudly.
    • English equivalent: It is not the hen that cackles the most that lay the most eggs.
    • Meaning: It is not he who advertises for himself the most that can achieve the greatest results.
    • Choe, Torchia (2007). Looking for a Mr. Kim in Seoul: A Guide to Korean Expressions. Infini Press. p. 232. 

DEdit

  • (뜻이 있는 곳에 길이 있다)
    • Transliteration: Dduhsi itnuhn kose kiri itda.
    • Translation: In a place where there is will, there is a road.
    • English equivalent: Where there's a will, there's a way.
    • Meaning: "If you are sufficiently determined to achieve something, then you will find a way of doing so."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 299. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • 열린대문과냉면한그릇. 이화여자대학교출판부. 1994. p. 65. 

KEdit

  • 콩 심은데 콩나고, 팥 심은데 팥난다
    • Transliteration: Kong simeundae kongnago, pat simeundae pat nanda.
    • Translation: Beans come out from where beans are planted, and padd (red beans) come out from where red beans are planted.
    • English equivalent: The fruit doesn't fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "48". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Hong, University (2007). Empowering families through enhancing "FILIAL PIETY" for parents at Jusarang Church, Ilsan, Korea. Regent University. p. 5. 

NEdit

  • 낮말은 새가 듣고 밤말은 쥐가 듣는다.
    • Transliteration:Natmaleun saega deudgo bammaleun juiga deudneunda.
    • Translation: Birds listen to day-words and rats listen to night-words.
    • English equivalent: The walls have ears.
    • Meaning: "What you say may be overheard; used as a warning."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 287. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 27 September 2013. 
    • 언어교육원 (2005). 말이트이는한국어. 이화여자대학교출판부. p. 135. 

SEdit

  • 서당개 삼 년에 풍월 읊는다
    • Transliteration: Seodanggae sam nyeone pungweol eupneunda.
    • Translation: After three years at a village schoolhouse, even a dog can recite a poem.
    • English equivalent: Practice makes perfect.
    • Choe, Torchia (2007). Looking for a Mr. Kim in Seoul: A Guide to Korean Expressions. Infini Press. p. 121. 
  • 시작이 반이다
    • Transliteration: Shijaki banida.
    • Transation: Starting is half the task.
    • English equivalent: Well begun is half done.
    • Meaning: "Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "40". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • (Korea) (1991). 2000-yōn. Hyŏndae Sahoe Yŏnʼguso. p. 149. 
  • 손바닥으로 하늘을 가리려한다
    • Transliteration: Sonbadageuro haneuleul gariryeohanda
    • Translation Don't try to cover the whole sky with the palm of your hand.
    • Meaning: One can only "cover" the sky if he covers his own eyes, but the sky is still there and can not be denied its existence. Therefore, this is a very foolish thing to do. It can either mean that you are denying your past actions and can not come to terms with yourself nor with the other person(s). or You are not being honest to yourself and not admitting how you feel about someone or something. or You are avoiding the obvious, but you are going to have to face it one day.
    • Wŏlgan Chungang. 中央日報社. 1989. p. 271. 

WEdit

  • 원숭이도 나무에서 떨어진다.
    • Transliteration: Weonsungido namueseo ddeoleojinda.
    • Translation: Even monkeys may fall from trees.
    • English equivalent: A good marksman may miss.
    • Meaning: Even experts make mistakes.
    • 논리와사고(증보개정판). 이화여자대학교출판부. 2003. p. 100. 
Last modified on 18 February 2014, at 02:19