Last modified on 18 February 2014, at 14:07

Karelian proverbs

Karelian is a language spoken in Karelia.

EEdit

  • Omas silmäs ei nävy ni parzi, a toizen silmäs nägyy toppu.
    • English equivalent: You see the splinter in another's eye but fail to see the beam in your own.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "20". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 131. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

HEdit

  • Hyvä zavoduš — puloi dielua.
    • English equivalent: Well begun, is half done.
    • Meaning: "Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process."
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "40". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

IEdit

  • Igä elä, igä opastu.
    • Translation: You are still not too old to learn.
    • English equivalent: We are to learn as long as we live.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "31". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 182. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

KEdit

  • Ken ci työdy tie, sil ei syvvägi pie.
    • Translation: He who does not work, also must not eat.
    • English equivalent: He that will not work, shall not eat.
    • Meaning: "Without due effort one is not entitled to the fruits of the work."
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "47". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 256. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Korval kuule, toizel työnnä.
    • Translation: In at one ear and out at the other.
    • English equivalent: Advice most needed are the least heeded.
    • Meaning: "For various reasons a good advice or a genuine warning is often disregarded or considered of no importance."
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "30". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 179. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kun kissa kois ei olega, hiiril on välja.
    • Translation: When the cat is not at home, the mice are free.
    • English equivalent: If the cat is away, the mice play.
    • Meaning: "In the absence of the person in authority those under his control will often neglect the duties/rules imposed on them."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "17". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 114. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kiäppü kuwzes päi ei лoitakse kirbou.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "48". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

MEdit

  • Millane msumo, moine i tytär.
    • Translation: Such mother, such daughter.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: "Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "21". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Millane tuatto, moine i piogu.
    • Translation: Such father, such son.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: "Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "28". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 170. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Mägi mägenke ei yhty yhtei, a ŕištšikanz ŕištšikanzanke yhtyu'.
    • Translation: Stones do not meet stones, but a face meets another face.
    • English equivalent: A mountain never meets a mountain, but a man meets a man.
    • Meaning: "There are some things/events that are impossible, like an encounter of mountains, but there is always a chance for people to meet. or Once can always find a possibility for revenge."
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "37". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 213. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

VEdit

  • Vierevä kivi ei jäkälly.
    • Translation and English equivalent: A rolling stone gathers no moss.
    • Meaning: "There are a Set of People in the World of fo unfettled and reftleis a Temper, and such Admirers of Novelty, that they can never be long pleafed with one way of’ living, no more than to continue long in one Habitation; but before they are well enter’d upon one Bufinefs, dip into another, and before they are well fettled in one Habitation, remove to another; fo that they are always bufily beginning to live, but by reafon of Ficklenefs and Impatience, never arrive at a way of living: fuch Perfons fall under the Doom of this Proverb, which is delign’d to fix the Volatility of their Tempers, by laying before them the ill Confequences of fuch Ficklenefs and Inconltancy."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Divers Proverbs, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [1]
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "14". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 100. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

See alsoEdit