Last modified on 23 July 2013, at 18:06

Justification (jurisprudence)

Justification in jurisprudence is an exception to the prohibition of committing certain offenses. When an act is justified, a person is not criminally liable even though their act would otherwise constitute an offense. For example, to intentionally commit a homicide would be considered murder. However, it is not considered a crime if committed in self-defense.

QuotesEdit

  • There are a thousand things might have been a justification.
    • Lord Mansfield, The King v. Williams (1774), Lofft. 762; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 146.
  • Is ill-language a justification for blows?
    • John Pratt, CJ., Case of Hugh Reason and another (1722), 16 How. St. Tr. 44; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 147.

External linksEdit

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