Last modified on 4 June 2014, at 14:17

January 11

Quotes of the day from previous years:

2005
If men would consider not so much where they differ, as wherein they agree, there would be far less of uncharitableness and angry feeling in the world. ~ Joseph Addison
2006
The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records. They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the hand of the divinity itself; and can never be erased or obscured by mortal power. ~ Alexander Hamilton (born 11 January 1755)
2007
Has it been found that bodies of men act with more rectitude or greater disinterestedness than individuals? The contrary of this has been inferred by all accurate observers of the conduct of mankind; and the inference is founded upon obvious reasons. Regard to reputation has a less active influence, when the infamy of a bad action is to be divided among a number than when it is to fall singly upon one. A spirit of faction, which is apt to mingle its poison in the deliberations of all bodies of men, will often hurry the persons of whom they are composed into improprieties and excesses, for which they would blush in a private capacity. ~ Alexander Hamilton
2008
I do indeed disbelieve that we or any other mortal men can attain on a given day to absolutely incorrigible and unimprovable truth about such matters of fact as those with which religions deal. But I reject this dogmatic ideal not out of a perverse delight in intellectual instability. I am no lover of disorder and doubt as such. Rather do I fear to lose truth by this pretension to possess it already wholly. ~ William James (born 11 January 1842)
2009
Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living, and your belief will help create the fact. ~ William James
2010
I should esteem it the extreme of imprudence to prolong the precarious state of our national affairs, and to expose the union to the jeopardy of successive experiments, in the chimerical pursuit of a perfect plan. I never expect to see a perfect work from imperfect man. The result of the deliberations of all collective bodies must necessarily be a compound as well of the errors and prejudices, as of the good sense and wisdom of the individuals of whom they are composed. ~ Alexander Hamilton
2011
We are closer to God when we are asking questions than when we think we have the answers. ~ Abraham Joshua Heschel
2012
When the sword is once drawn, the passions of men observe no bounds of moderation. ~ Alexander Hamilton
2013
We must make the best of those ills which cannot be avoided.
~ Alexander Hamilton ~
2014
There is but one indefectibly certain truth, and that is the truth that pyrrhonistic scepticism itself leaves standing, — the truth that the present phenomenon of consciousness exists.
~ William James ~
2015 
Rank or add further suggestions…

Ranking system:

4 : Excellent - should definitely be used.
3 : Very Good - strong desire to see it used.
2 : Good - some desire to see it used.
1 : Acceptable - but with no particular desire to see it used.
0 : Not acceptable - not appropriate for use as a quote of the day.


SuggestionsEdit

Why has government been instituted at all? Because the passions of men will not conform to the dictates of reason and justice, without constraint. ~ Alexander Hamilton (day of Birth)

  • Potus23 00:18, 10 January 2006 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:53, 10 January 2006 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 05:24, 10 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 because a system of checking upon man's excesses is important. The institution of government should therefore rectify and prevent the damage of justice, furthermore constraining those who are intent on harming the government, its ideals, or being governed by their own principles not dictated by the sanctions of law. Zarbon 18:06, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The history of human conduct does not warrant that exalted opinion of human virtue which would make it wise in a nation to commit interests of so delicate and momentous a kind as those which concern its intercourse with the rest of the world to the sole disposal of a magistrate, created and circumstanced, as would be a President of the United States. ~ Alexander Hamilton (born January 11, 1755 or 1757)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 05:24, 10 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 18:06, 22 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 14:11, 6 January 2009 (UTC)

Real culture lives by sympathies and admirations, not by dislikes and disdain — under all misleading wrappings it pounces unerringly upon the human core. ~ William James (born 11 January 1842)

  • 3 Kalki 23:27, 9 January 2007 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 3 InvisibleSun 05:24, 10 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 18:06, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Genius, in truth, means little more than the faculty of perceiving in an unhabitual way. ~ William James (born 11 January 1842)

  • 3 Kalki 23:27, 9 January 2007 (UTC) with a strong lean toward 4.
  • 3 InvisibleSun 05:24, 10 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 18:06, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

The normal process of life contains moments as bad as any of those which insane melancholy is filled with, moments in which radical evil gets its innings and takes its solid turn. The lunatic's visions of horror are all drawn from the material of daily fact. ~ William James


Man's chief difference from the brutes lies in the exuberant excess of his subjective propensities — his preeminence over them simply and solely in the number and in the fantastic and unnecessary character of his wants, physical, moral, aesthetic, and intellectual. Had his whole life not been a quest for the superfluous, he would never have established himself as inexpugnably as he has done in the necessary. ~ William James

  • 3 InvisibleSun 05:24, 10 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 14:47, 19 January 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 18:06, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Away with all cars, they are the devil's work! ~ Kudno Mojesic. He was arrested in the street outside his Belgrade home attacking cars with an axe. Sunday Mirror, London UK: 11TH January 1976.

  • 4 ds238 03:46, 9 June 2008 (PST)
  • 0 Zarbon 06:19, 14 December 2008 (UTC)
  • 0 Kalki 14:11, 6 January 2009 (UTC) obscure statement by an obscure author. I might rank it a 1 if a page for the author could be justified, but I see no strong reason for one, nor for this quote as a quote of the day.

There are two ways of constructing a software design: One way is to make it so simple that there are obviously no deficiencies, and the other way is to make it so complicated that there are no obvious deficiencies. The first method is far more difficult. It demands the same skill, devotion, insight, and even inspiration as the discovery of the simple physical laws which underlie the complex phenomena of nature. ~ C. A. R. Hoare (date of birth)

  • 4 Ningauble 17:20, 29 October 2008 (UTC) (I would also approve using this without the final sentence.)
  • 1 Zarbon 06:19, 14 December 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 14:11, 6 January 2009 (UTC) but might eventually rank it a 3
  • 3 InvisibleSun 21:45, 10 January 2009 (UTC)

As for myself, my course is clear. A British subject I was born — a British subject I will die. ~ John A. Macdonald

  • 3 Zarbon 06:19, 14 December 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Kalki 14:11, 6 January 2009 (UTC) not much real context to the statement, as it is stated.
  • 1 InvisibleSun 21:45, 10 January 2009 (UTC)

Man is a messenger who forgot the message. ~ Abraham Joshua Heschel

  • 3 Zarbon 06:19, 14 December 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 14:11, 6 January 2009 (UTC)

I have thought it my duty to exhibit things as they are, not as they ought to be. ~ Alexander Hamilton (born January 11)

  • 3 because to be frank and blatant is sometimes the best course of action. Zarbon 04:56, 2 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 14:11, 6 January 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4; despite the major importance of some sense of the need for things to be better, one should not shrink from confronting many forms of existing error, deficiency and stupidity for what they are, including those which primarily or relentlessly focus upon the emphasis of the undesirable aspects of things and people which do have good qualities, and can be improved.
  • 2 InvisibleSun 21:45, 10 January 2009 (UTC)

Government implies the power of making laws. It is essential to the idea of a law, that it be attended with a sanction; or, in other words, a penalty or punishment for disobedience. ~ Alexander Hamilton (born January 11)

  • 3 because without some form of punishment, there would be anarchy. Zarbon 04:56, 2 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 14:11, 6 January 2009 (UTC) Not all use the term anarchy simply as a pejorative implying violent oppressive struggles for power. It is used in reference to such thinkers as Leo Tolstoy and others in a ways signifying far more reasonable, moderate, patient struggles for consensus and towards wisdom, and away from far too great a reliance upon the rule of power and laws born of personal or partisan will for power, in favor of those habits and customs which can be established through a far more fundamental and personally transcendent will for Truth and Grace. ~ Kalki 14:11, 6 January 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 21:45, 10 January 2009 (UTC)

Men often oppose a thing merely because they have had no agency in planning it, or because it may have been planned by those whom they dislike. ~ Alexander Hamilton (born January 11)

  • 3 because this is very true. Many times, even when men may agree with an ideology, they will decline to go along with it simply because they may dislike who is saying it. Thickheadedness has been a supreme cause of man's sheer dogmatism and blindness for his own comrades. To throw away an opinion, plan, or idea just because of who is behind it...is clearly a sign of mental blindness, one far worse than the blindness of eyesight. Zarbon 04:56, 2 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 14:11, 6 January 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.

As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use.
~ William James ~

There is but one unconditional commandment, which is that we should seek incessantly, with fear and trembling, so to vote and to act as to bring about the very largest total universe of good which we can see.
~ William James ~