Henry Abbey

Henry Abbey (11 July 18427 June 1911) was an American writer and poet.

SourcedEdit

FaciebatEdit

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  • As thoughts possess the fashion of the mood

     That gave them birth, so every deed we do,
Partakes of our inborn disquietude
     That spurns the old and reaches toward the new.
The noblest works of human art and pride
Show that their makers were not satisfied.

  • For, looking down the ladder of our deeds,

     The rounds seem slender. All past work appears
Unto the doer faulty. The heart bleeds,
     And pale Regret turns weltering in tears,
To think how poor our best has been, how vain,
Beside the excellence we would attain.

What do we plant when we plant a tree?Edit

Full text at Wikisource
  • What do we plant when we plant a tree?
    A thousand things that we daily see,
    We plant the spire that out-towers the crag,
    We plant the staff for our country's flag;
    We plant the shade from the hot sun free,
    We plant all these when we plant the tree.

The French MarshalEdit

Full text at Wikisource
  • McMahon up the street of Paris came,
    In triumph from Magenta. Every one
    Had heard and praised the fearless marshal’s name,
    And gloried in the deeds that he had done.
    Crowds packed the walks, and at each seperate glass
    A face was set to see the hero pass.

External linksEdit

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Last modified on 18 February 2014, at 18:12