Last modified on 16 March 2014, at 19:26

Harry Blackmun

Justice Blackmun Official.jpg

Harry Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908March 4, 1999) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 to 1994.

SourcedEdit

  • The right to privacy...is broad enough to encompass a woman's decision whether or not to terminate her pregnancy.
    • Writing for the court, Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113, 153 (1973)
  • In order to get beyond racism, we must first take account of race. There is no other way. And in order to treat some persons equally, we must treat them differently.
  • Poor Joshua! Victim of repeated attacks by an irresponsible, bullying, cowardly, and intemperate father, and abandoned by respondents who placed him in a dangerous predicament and who knew or learned what was going on, and yet did essentially nothing except, as the Court revealingly observes, ante, at 193, "dutifully recorded these incidents in [their] files." It is a sad commentary upon American life, and constitutional principles - so full of late of patriotic fervor and proud proclamations about "liberty and justice for all" - that this child, Joshua DeShaney, now is assigned to live out the remainder of his life profoundly retarded. Joshua and his mother, as petitioners here, deserve - but now are denied by this Court - the opportunity to have the facts of their case considered in the light of the constitutional protection that 42 U.S.C. 1983 is meant to provide."
    • Dissent in DeShaney v. Winnebago County, 489 U.S. 189 (1989)
  • From this day forward, I no longer shall tinker with the machinery of death. For more than 20 years, I have endeavored - indeed, I have struggled - along with a majority of this Court, to develop procedural and substantive rules that would lend more than the mere appearance of fairness to the death penalty endeavor. Rather than continue to coddle the Court's delusion that the desired level of fairness has been achieved and the need for regulation eviscerated, I feel morally and intellectually obligated simply to concede that the death penalty experiment has failed.
    • Dissent from the denial of certiori, Callins v. James, 510 U.S. 1141 (1994)

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