Last modified on 1 June 2014, at 17:05

Frisian proverbs

Frisian is a distinguished dialect spoken in northern Netherlands.

AEdit

  • A kü moalkat trog a hols.
    • English equivalent: It's by the head that the cow gives the milk.
    • It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants. What are you industrious about?
    • Henry David Thoreau, letter to Harrison Blake (16 November 1857).
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1039. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • An slacht müs, thiar man ian hål hä.
    • Translation and English equivalent: It is a poor mouse that has only one hole.
    • Meaning: It is dangerous to always depend on just one thing, because if it fails you, you will not have any alternatives.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 375. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • As de kat fan hûs is, tilt de mûs de sturt omheech.
    • Translation: When the cat is not at home, the mouse will lift his tail.
    • English equivalent: If the cat is away, the mice play.
    • Meaning: "In the absence of the person in authority those under his control will often neglect the duties/rules imposed on them."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Martin H. Manser (2007). "17". The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 114. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 8 September 2013. 

BEdit

  • Bergen moetsje inoar net, mar minsken wol.
    • Translation and English equivalent: A mountain never meets a mountain, but a man meets a man.
    • Meaning: "There are some things/events that are impossible, like an encounter of mountains, but there is always a chance for people to meet. or Once can always find a possibility for revenge."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 213. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Bähsere, alliene, ás äujn hijn sêlsháp.
    • Translation: It is better to be alone than to be in bad company.
    • English equivalent: Better be alone than in bad company.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 572. ISBN 0415096243. 

DEdit

  • De apel falt net fier fan 'e beam.
    • Translation and English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • De stijn, dirr ōfting wāllert wort, begràit ài.
    • Translation and English equivalent: A rolling stone gathers no moss.
    • Meaning: "There are a Set of People in the World of fo unfettled and reftleis a Temper, and such Admirers of Novelty, that they can never be long pleafed with one way of’ living, no more than to continue long in one Habitation; but before they are well enter’d upon one Bufinefs, dip into another, and before they are well fettled in one Habitation, remove to another; fo that they are always bufily beginning to live, but by reafon of Ficklenefs and Impatience, never arrive at a way of living: fuch Perfons fall under the Doom of this Proverb, which is delign’d to fix the Volatility of their Tempers, by laying before them the ill Confequences of fuch Ficklenefs and Inconltancy."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Divers Proverbs, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [1]
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "14". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 100. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Dy't swijt, stimt ta, seit ja.
    • "Those who do not reply to a request or accusation, or who raise no objection to something said or done, are assumed to have acquiesced."
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 244. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "94". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 430. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

EEdit

  • En blinn hänn fánt ock en kjárl.
    • Translation: A blind hen also finds a corn.
    • English equivalent: Even a blind pig may occasionally pick up an acorn.
    • Meaning: "An incompetent person or an unsystematic approach is bound to succeed every now and then by chance."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 75. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 8 September 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 36. ISBN 0415096243. 

HEdit

  • Ham skal liar, so laang üüs-m lewwet.
    • Translation: One should learn as long as one lives.
    • English equivalent: We are to learn as long as we live.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 182. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

IEdit

  • Iarst fang, do fluai.
    • English equivalent: Don't sell the skin till you have caught the bear.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 641. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • It giet jin ta it iene ear yn en ta 't oare ear wer út.
    • Translation: In at one ear and out at the other.
    • English equivalent: Advice most needed is the least heeded.
    • Meaning: For various reasons a good advice or a genuine warning is often disregarded or considered of no importance.
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 179. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • It is in minne fûgel dy't syn eigen nêst besmoarget.
  • It is mei sizzen net te dwaan.
    • Translation: It is not done by talking.
    • English equivalent: Fine words butter no parsnips.
    • Meaning: Merely talking about a problem will not solve it.
    • Eisma (2000). It is mei sizzen net te dwaan: sprekwurden, siswizen en útdrukkingen. Fryslân. 

MEdit

  • Meet drymael, eer gy éens snydt.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Measure thrice, cut once.
    • Meaning: One should always act only after due consideration. A hasty action may involve an improper consideration of important aspects.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

NEdit

  • Nüms kan twe heren denen.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Nobody can serve two masters.
    • Meaning: "One cannot serve two conflicting causes simultaneously. If this is attempted neither will be served properly."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 283. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

SEdit

  • Sa heit, sa soan.
    • Translation: Such father, such son.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: "Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 170. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Sa mem, sa dochter.
    • Translation: Such mother, such daughter.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: "Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Sefte hannen meitze stionckende wounen.
    • English equivalent: Mild physician – putrid wounds.
    • Meaning: Stern measures makes for a good figurative and literal cure.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1091. ISBN 0415096243. 

TEdit

  • Tidd an Fläujd täiwe êfter Nemmen.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Time and tide waits for no man.
    • Meaning: "Take, for illustration, the case of the negligent and unreflecting man. He resolves to accomplish a certain important object at some future period; but in the intervening time, some preparatory, though in itself comparatively trifling business, is indispensable. He defers this business; [...] At length the period for accomplishing the ultimate object arrives: but, alas! the prerequisite, so absolutely connected and essential, is neglected And then, vain man!
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 169. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 723. ISBN 0415096243. 

UEdit

  • Uunbeden Thiinst sjonkt.
    • Translation: Unasked for service stinks.
    • English equivalent: Proffer'd service stinks.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1149. ISBN 0415096243. 

YEdit

  • Yn troebel wetter is 't goed fiskjen.
    • Translation: It is good fishing in streamy water.
    • English equivalent: It is good fishing in troubled waters.
    • Meaning: "In taking advantage of chaotic conditions one can easily serve one's own purposes."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 391. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

See alsoEdit