Frank Westheimer

Frank Henry Westheimer (January 15, 1912April 14, 2007) was an American chemist. He was the Morris Loeb Professor of Chemistry Emeritus at Harvard University, and the Westheimer medal is named in his honour.

SourcedEdit

  • A couple of months in the laboratory can frequently save a couple of hours in the library.
    • Crampon, Jean E. 1988. Murphy, Parkinson, and Peter: Laws for librarians. Library Journal 113. no. 17 (October 15), p. 41.
    • Various forms, often credited as Westheimer’s Discovery – other forms include:
    • Some version perhaps found in 1979 interview, Frank H. Westheimer, Oral Histories, Chemical Heritage Foundation, in chapter “Research Projects and Philosophy”, p. 63, topic “Reading the literature.”
  • James Bryant Conant, to Frank Westheimer on presenting an idea: (Harvard Gazette)
    • “It may not work, but if it does, it will be a footnote to a footnote in the history of chemistry.”
    • Presumably in 1979 interview, section “Graduate Study at Harvard”, pp. 16–31, topic “Important conversation with James Conant.”

External linksEdit

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Last modified on 14 December 2013, at 09:12