Expectations

Expectations are, in the case of uncertainty, things that are considered the most likely to happen. An expectation, which is a belief that is centered on the future, may or may not be realistic. A less advantageous result gives rise to the emotion of disappointment. If something happens that is not at all expected it is a surprise. An expectation about the behavior or performance of another person, expressed to that person, may have the nature of a strong request, or an order.

SourcedEdit

  • "Yet doth he live!" exclaims th' impatient heir,
    And sighs for sables which he must not wear.
    • Lord Byron, Lara, A Tale (1814), Canto I, Stanza 3.
  • I have known him [Micawber] come home to supper with a flood of tears, and a declaration that nothing was now left but a jail; and go to bed making a calculation of the expense of putting bow-windows to the house, "in case anything turned up," which was his favorite expression.
  • I suppose, to use our national motto, something will turn up. [Motto of Vraibleusia.]
  • He was fash and full of faith that "something would turn up."
  • Everything comes if a man will only wait.
  • Since yesterday I have been in Alcalá.
    Erelong the time will come, sweet Preciosa,
    When that dull distance shall no more divide us;
    And I no more shall scale thy wall by night
    To steal a kiss from thee, as I do now.
  • There have sat
    The live-long day, with patient expectation,
    To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome.
  • Promising is the very air o' the time; it opens the eyes of expectation: performance is ever the duller for his act; and, but in the plainer and simpler kind of people, the deed of saying is quite out of use.
  • 'Tis silence all,
    And pleasing expectation.

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical QuotationsEdit

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 243-44.
  • Serene I fold my hands and wait,
    Nor care for wind or tide nor sea;
    I rave no more 'gainst time or fate,
    For lo! my own shall come to me.
  • What else remains for me?
    Youth, hope and love;
    To build a new life on a ruined life.
  • Blessed is he who expects nothing for he shall never be disappointed.
    • Alexander Pope, letter to Gay (Oct. 6, 1727). Called by Pope and Gay "The Eighth Beatitude." Bishop Heber refers to it as "Swift's Eighth Beatitude." Also called "The Ninth Beatitude".
  • 'Tis expectation makes a blessing dear;
    Heaven were not Heaven, if we knew what it were.
  • Although I enter not,
    Yet round about the spot
    Ofttimes I hover;
    And near the sacred gate,
    With longing eyes I wait,
    Expectant of her.
  • Blessed are those that nought expect,
    For they shall not be disappointed.
    • John Walcot, Ode to Pitt.
  • It is folly to expect men to do all that they may reasonably be expected to do.

External linksEdit

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Last modified on 24 May 2012, at 23:59