Last modified on 26 July 2014, at 06:27

Czech proverbs

Proverbs from all Czech speaking parts of the world.

AEdit

BEdit

  • Bez práce nejsou koláče.
    • Translation: There are no cakes without a job.
    • English equivalent: No pain, no gain; Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
    • Meaning: Where there is no adversity of some sort there is seldom anything to win.
    • Source: Šedivý, Ivo Bez práce nejsou koláče (1982)
  • Bude-li v holubníku krm, holubi se sletí.
    • English equivalent: He that makes himself an ass must not take it ill if men ride him.
    • Meaning: Other people will abuse you, if you let them.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 676. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Hlubší voda kalná jen když se mele.
    • English equivalent: Crooked logs make straight fires.
    • Meaning: If nothing better is available, anything flawed is also useful; Instead of being frustrated by a bad situation, try to find ways to improve it.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 683. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bůh dá den, Bůh dá pokrm.
    • English equivalent: Each day brings it own bread.
    • Meaning: Try not to worry so much about the future.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 757. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bůh neopustí toho, kdo se naň spustí.
    • English equivalent: He who serves God has a good master.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 873. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bůh območí, Bůh též osuší.
    • English equivalent:God who gives the wound gives the salve.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 874. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bůh trojici miluje.
    • English equivalent: All good things are three.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 80. ISBN 0415096243. 

CEdit

  • Chudoba cti netratí.
    • Translation: Poverty does not lose honour.
    • Meaning: Even a poor man can be honorable.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volume 1. Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chudobná to myš, co jen jednu díru má.
    • English equivalent: It is a poor mouse that has only one hole.
    • Meaning: It is dangerous to always depend on just one thing, because if it fails you, you will not have any alternatives.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 375. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chceš-li z pole bráti, musíš na ně dáti.
    • English equivalent: Plough deep while sluggards sleep, and you will have corn to sell and keep.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1001. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Co je napsáno, to nesmyješ.
    • English equivalent: Never write what you dare not sign.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1101. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Co můžeš udělat dnes, neodkládej na zítřek.
    • Translation, English equivalent: Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today.
    • DeCost (2007). Milenka. Absent Willow Publishing. p. 51. 
  • Co se lehce nabude, snadno se pozbude.
    • English equivalent: Easy come, easy go.
    • Meaning: "Things that are easily acquired, especially money, are just as easily loat or spent."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 71. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 7 September 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 762. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Co si naseješ, to žáti budeš.
    • Translation: What you reap is what you sow.
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 394. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Co oči nevidí, srdce nebolí.
    • Translation: What eyes don´t see, heart doesn´t hurt.
    • English Equivalent: Out of sight - out of mind.
    • Kitz Volker. Jak žít podle vlastních představ. p. 113. ISBN 8024741881. 

ČEdit

  • Čas jsou peníze.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Time is money.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1008. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Čiň čertu dobře, peklem se ti odmění.
    • Translation: Ingratitude is the worlds reward.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 55. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Čeho nelze předělati, darmo na to žehrati.
    • Translation: Don't complain about what you can't change.
    • English equivalent: Take things as you find them.
    • Meaning: Adapt yourself to new surroundings or conditions. For instance, if you are ill, do what you still can instead of waiting to get healthy.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 865. ISBN 0415096243. 

DEdit

  • Dlouhý jazyk, krátké ruce.
    • Translation: The longer the tongue, the shorter the hands.
    • English equivalent: He that promises too much means nothing.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 92. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Dvakrát měř, jednou řež.
    • Measure twice, cut once.
      • Quoted in collected works of Karolina Světlá, p 155 (1903).: Measure twice, cut once; before you speak, think over again at least once what you intend to say.
  • Darovanému koni na zuby nehleď.
    • Translation: Don't look at a gift horse's teeth.
    • English equivalent: Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.
    • Meaning: Don't criticize gifts.
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 54. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Quoted in collected works of Jan Evangelista Purkyně, p 55 (1968): Einem geschenkten Gaul - a variant of the Czech proverb: Don't look at a gift horse's teeth.
  • Dáš-li prst, vezme hrst.
    • English equivalent: Give him an inch and he will take a yard.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 240. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Dobrá vůle stojí za skutek.
    • English equivalent: Take the will for the deed.
    • Meaning: Judge by the well intentioned effort, and not its effects.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 881. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dobré jméno, nejlepší dědictví.
    • English equivalent: A good name is the best of all treasures.
    • Meaning: It is wise not to speak when it is not necessary.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 58. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Do zavřených úst nevletí moucha.
    • English equivalent: A closed mouth catches no flies.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 751. ISBN 0415096243. 

ĎEdit

EEdit

  • Čeho nelze předělati, darmo na to žehrati.
    • English equivalent: Gnaw the bone which is fallen to thy lot.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 865. ISBN 0415096243. 

FEdit

GEdit

HEdit

  • Hlas lidu, hlas boží.
    • English equivalent: The voice of the people is the voice of god.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1164. ISBN 0415096243. 

CHEdit

  • Chceš-li tajnou vĕc aneb pravdu vyzvĕdĕti, blázen, dítě, opilý člověk o tom umějí pověděti.
    • English equivalent: Children, fools and drunken men tell the truth.
    • Meaning: Children and fools have no inhibition, and alcohol consumed removes the inhibition against telling the truth that occasionally one would like to keep secret.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 272. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

IEdit

JEdit

  • Jablko nepadne daleko od stromu.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Jak k jídlu, tak i k dílu.
    • English equivalent: Quick at meat, quick at work.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1150. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Jak kdo zaseje, tak také sklidí.
    • Translation: As one sows, so shall he reap.
    • English equivalent: As you sow, so shall you reap.
    • Jr (2011). Czechmate: From Bohemian Paradise to American Haven. AuthorHouse. p. 52. ISBN 1456714457. 
  • Jak se do lesa volá, tak se z lesa ozývá.
    • Translation: You get what you give.
    • English equivalent: The way you call into a forest, the way it echoes back.
    • Meaning: One will often be equally politely treated as one treats others.
    • Jr (2011). Czechmate: From Bohemian Paradise to American Haven. AuthorHouse. p. 51. ISBN 1456714457. 
  • Jak chodí starý rak, mladý se učí tak.
    • Translation: What kind of parents, such children.
    • Meaning: Children will become like older generations.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Jaká matka, taková dcerka.
    • Translation: Such mother, such daughter.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and rarely.
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Jeden blázen deset jiných nadělá.
    • English equivalent: One fool makes many.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1132. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Jedna vlaštovka jaro nedělá.
    • Translation: A swallow does not make a spring.
    • Meaning: One occurrence is no indication that a major change is taking place.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volume 1. Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Jiné má na srdci a jiné na jazyku.
    • English equivalent: A honey tongue and a heart of gall.
    • Note: A hypo proverb of Beware of wolves in sheep's clothing.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 108. ISBN 0415160502. 

KEdit

  • Každý ptáček svým nosem se živí.
    • English equivalent: Every bird must hatch its own eggs.
    • Meaning: We must depend on ourselves, financially and in other regards.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 777. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kde tě nesvrbí, nedrbej.
    • Translation: To whom it itches, scratches it.
    • English equivalent: If the shoe fits, wear it.
    • Meaning: Accept an unflattering, yet accurate, description of yourself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 998. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kdo chce příliš mnoho, nemívá nic.
    • English equivalent: Grasp all, lose all.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volume 1. Routledge. p. 886. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kdo chce psa bít, hůl si vždycky najde.
    • Translation: He who wants to beat the dog will always find a stick.
    • Meaning: He who wants to be mean will find things to be mean about no matter what.
    • Novák (2005). Přestaňte se podceňovat!. Grada. p. 146. ISBN 8024711656. 
  • Kdo do nebe plije, na jeho vlastní tvář slina bije.
    • Translation: He who digs a pit for others, will fall in it himself.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volume 1. Routledge. p. 651. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kdo dřív přijde, ten dřív mele.
  • Kdo hosta rád vidí, i psa jeho nakrmí.
    • English equivalent: love me, love my dog.
    • Meaning: If you love someone, you will like virtually everything about him.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 952. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kdo nemá v hlavĕ, musí míti v nohou.
    • English equivalent: Who falls short in the head must be long in the heels.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "149". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 140. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Kdo se směje naposled, ten se směje nejlépe.
    • Translation and English equivalent: He laughs best who laughs last.
    • Meaning: "Minor successes or failures along the way are of no significance – the person who is ultimately triumphant is the only real winner."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 123. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
  • Kdo si panskou lásku chválí, čímsi nejistým se šálí.
    • English equivalent: A king's favour is no inheritance.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Kdo uteĉ, ten vyhraje.
    • Translation: Who runs away, he wins.
    • English equivalent: He who fights and runs away may live to fight another day.
    • Meaning: "It is wiser to withdraw from a situation that you cannot win than to go on fighting and lose – by a strategic retreat you can return to the battle or argument with renewed energy at a later date."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 123. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 702. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ke všem musíš rovnost míti, chceš-li spravedlivým soudcem býti.
    • English equivalent: Don't hear one and judge two.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 729. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kočka myši nenechá, liška slepic a vlk ovec.
    • English equivalent: What is bred in the bone will not go out of the flesh.
    • Meaning: What is innate is not to be eradicated by force of education or self discipline: these may modify the outward manifestations of a man's nature, but not transmute the nature itself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 985. ISBN 0415096243. 
    • Source for meaning: Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. X. 
  • Kočku pohladíš-li, hned ocas zdvíhá.
    • Translation: Cat patting leads to hump raising.
    • English equivalent: The more you stroke the cat's tail, the more he raises his back.
    • Meaning: Displaying too much affection or desperation repels your friends and love interests.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1184. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Koho pán potrestati chce, nejprv mu rozum vezme.
    • English equivalent: Whom God will destroy, he first make mad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 841. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Komu není rady, tomu není pomoci.
    • Translation: He who can't be advised, can also not be helped.
    • English equivalent: He that will not be counseled cannot be helped.
    • Meaning: Advice often contain a genuine warning or an effective suggestion, which is unprudent not to take into consideration.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 964. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Kovářova kobyla chodí bosa.
    • Translation: The blacksmith's mare walks barefoot.
    • English equivalent: The shoemaker goes barefoot.
    • Meaning: "Working hard for others one may neglect one's own needs or the needs of those closest to him."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kradl zloděj, kradl, až z šibeničky spadl.
    • English equivalent: Punishment is lame but it comes.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 682. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Krátké porovnání lepŝí, než dlouhé sporování.
    • English equivalent: A bad compromise is better than a good lawsuit.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 68. ISBN 0415096243. 

LEdit

  • Láska prochází žaludkem.
    • Translation: Love goes via the stomach.
    • English equivalent: The way to a man's heart is through his stomach.
    • Alexander, Bastyra, Hutchings, Jansová, Lipman, Čech (1995). Láska procházížaludkem: Sexuálnía intimnírecepty pro hladovémilence. Mustang. ISBN 8071910163. 
  • Lékaři, uzdrav se sám!
    • English equivalent: Physician, heal yourself!
    • Meaning: "Do not reproach another person for something that you are equally guilty of."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 223. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1142. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lépe pozdě než nikdy.
    • Translation, English equivalent: Better late than never.
    • Tolstoj (2005). Vojna a mír. Baronet. p. 415. ISBN 8072148621. 
  • Lépe je více věděti a méně mluviti.
    • English equivalent: Keep your mouth shut and your ears open.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 160. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Lépe míti sto přátel, než jednoho nepřítele.
    • English equivalent: Do not think that one enemy is insignificant, or that a thousand friends are too many.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 718. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lepší doma krajíc chleba než v cizině kráva celá.
    • English equivalent: Dry bread at home is better than roast meat abroad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 754. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lež má krátké nohy.
    • Translation: A lie has short legs.
    • English equivalent: A lie has no legs.
    • Simone (2010). Jak nebýt perfektní, ale úspěšný:. Grada Publishing a.s.. p. 72. ISBN 8024735407. 
  • Lepši jedno dnes, než dvoje zítra.
    • Translation: Better one today, than two tomorrow.
    • English equivalent: One today is worth two tomorrows.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1137. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lepší málo, než nic.
    • English equivalent: Better an egg today than a hen tomorrow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 75. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Lepší vrabec v hrsti než holub na střeše.
    • Translation Better [is] a sparrow in the hand than a pigeon on the roof.
    • English equivalent A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
    • Meaning: "Something you have for certain now is of more value than something better you may get, especially if you risk losing what you have in order to get it."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 28. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 29 July 2013. 
  • Lépe jest v samotě býti, nežli spolek se zlými míti.
    • Translation: Better be alone than in bad company.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 163. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Lžeš-li, nepŕepínej.
    • English equivalent: A liar should have a good memory.
    • Meaning: "Liars must remember the untruths they have told, to avoid contradicting themselves at some later date."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 167. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "274". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 257. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. Retrieved on 24 November 2013. 

MEdit

  • Malé ryby taky ryby.
    • Translation: Small fish is also fish.
    • English equivalent: Better a bad bush than no shelter.
    • Meaning: "A man's present occupation may not be lucrative, or his connections as serviceable as he could wish, but he should not therefore quit them he has better."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). 1859. p. 155. 
    • Kukal (2007). Povídánía hry s českými příslovími - pro děti od 6 do 10 let. Grada. p. 52. ISBN 8024718200. 
  • Mnoho povolaných, málo vyvolených.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Many are called but few are chosen.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1083. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Modlí se před kaplí a čert mu sedí v kápi. (= Zdání klame.)
    • English equivalent: A fair face and a foul heart.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 34. ISBN 0415160502. 

NEdit

  • Na boha se spolehni, ale sám se přičiň.
    • Translation: Depend on God, but rely on your own cause.
    • English equivalent: Heaven helps those who help themselves.
    • Meaning: When in trouble first of all every one himself should do his best to improve his condition.
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 150. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volume 1. Routledge. p. 732. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Na dluženém koni nedobře se jezdí.
    • English equivalent: Take heed of enemies reconciled and of meat twice boiled.
    • Meaning: Your supposedly former enemies will cunningly take revenge on you just out of spite; Trust not a reconciled enemy more than an open foe.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 25. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Na každém šprochu pravdy trochu.
    • Translation: In every piece of gossip [is] a bit of truth.
    • English equivalent: There is no smoke without fire.
    • Other meaning: Everything happens for a reason.
      • Quoted by Jan Cimický in Trápení lásky, p 29 (2007): Why, in every piece of gossip is a bit of truth! Such a stupid affair! Is it possible at all to explain that it isn't true, that they are only writing it as they need something to write about, so as to earn more by banner headlines and sell the biggest possible print run of the tabloid?
  • Na ptáky lepem, ne cepem.
    • English equivalent: Deal gently with the bird you mean to catch.
    • "When people are are just, they need friendship in addition."
    • Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (c. 325 BC), Book VIII, 1155.a26
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 689. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Na tvrdý špalek tvrdý klín.
    • English equivalent: You must meet roughness with roughness.
    • Example: If someone treats you poorly, you should treat him equally poorly.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 12. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Nebuď zvědavý, budeš brzy starý.
    • Translation: Do not be curious, you'll soon be old.
    • English equivalent: Curiosity killed the cat.
    • Meaning: "Inquisitiveness – or a desire to find about something – can lead you into trouble."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 49. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 9 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 684. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nehas, co tě nepálí.
    • Translation: Don't put out a fire that isn't burning you.
    • English equivalent: Mind your own business.
    • Meaning: Don't get involved into other peoples' problems. The underlying meaning is either not to poke one's nose into other peoples' business, but more often it is meant as a controversial advice not to waste one's effort on issues that are indifferent to one (or might even cause hardship to one).
    • Kukal (2007). Povídánía hry s českými příslovími - pro děti od 6 do 10 let. Grada. p. 62. ISBN 8024718200. 
  • Nemoc na koni přijíždí a pěšky odchází.
    • English equivalent: Misfortune comes on horseback and goes away on foot.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 65. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nekupuj zajíce v pytli.
    • English equivalent: Let the buyer have a thousand eyes for the seller wants only one.
    • "I formulate my law, which was wrung out of me after twenty years of wearying defense of science fiction against attacks of people who used the worst examples of the field for ammunition, and whose conclusion was that ninety percent of SF is crud. Using the same standards that categorize 90% of science fiction as trash, crud, or crap, it can be argued that 90% of film, literature, consumer goods, e.tc is crap."
    • Theodore Sturgeon Venture (1957)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1101. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Není štěstí bez závisti.
    • English equivalent: Envy always shooteth at a high mark.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 766. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Není všechno zlato, co se třpytí.
    • Translation: All is not gold that glitters.
    • English equivalent: All that glitters is not gold.
    • Meaning: An attractive appearance may be deceptive. It may cover or hide a much less favourable content.
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 114. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Wienerová (2008). Napsáno životem a jinépovídky. Tribun EU. p. 138. ISBN 8073995050. 
  • Nepřidávej oleje k ohni.
    • Translation: You should not add oil to the fire.
    • English equivalent: Don't add fuel to the fire.
    • Meaning: One should not make a bad situation even worse by an improper remark.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 338. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Neptej se starého, ptej se zkušeného.
    • Translation: Do not ask the old, ask an experienced.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 808. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nevěř slovům, věř skutkům.
    • Translation: Do not trust words, trust deeds.
    • English equivalent: No need of words, trust deeds.
    • Meaning: "Actions may be, and indeed sometimes are deceptive in a measure though not as much so as words; and accordingly are received in general as more full and satisfactory proofs of the real disposition and character of persons than verbal expressions."
    • Source for meaning:Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 10. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 91. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nežeň se očima, ale ušima.
    • English equivalent: Choose a wife rather by your ear than your eye.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 655. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Nové koště dobře mete.
    • English equivalent: New brooms sweep clean.
    • Meaning: Newcomers are the most ambitious.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1103. ISBN 0415096243. 

OEdit

  • Obecná řeč, obecná pravda.
    • Translation: Generally said, generally true.
    • English equivalent: What everyone says must be true.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 662. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Oko hledí daleko, a mysl ještě dále.
    • Translation: Brains are farther than the eye.
    • English equivalent: The eye looks but it is the mind that sees.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1175. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Otep nepřelomíš, a po prutu všecku zlámeš.
    • English equivalent: United we stand, divided we fall; Union is strength.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 79. ISBN 0415096243. 

PEdit

  • Pes, který štěká, nekouše.
    • Translation: A dog that barks doesn't bite.
    • English equivalent: Barking dogs seldom bite.
    • Meaning: People who make the most or the loudest threats are the least likely to take action.
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 20 June 2013. 
    • Čechová (1996). Čeština: řeča jazyk. ISV Nakl.. p. 291. ISBN 8085866129. 
  • Plavce topí moře a nás zasypuje hoře.
    • Translation: The sea drowns a swimmer and fills us up to a mountain.
    • English equivalent: Fretting cares make grey hairs.
    • Meaning: Worrying is a negative activity that can age you prematurely.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 631. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Po bitvě je každý generálem.
    • Translation: After a battle everyone is a general.
    • English equivalent: Hindsight is 20-20; After wit is every body's wit.
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 291. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Pozdě, ale přece.
    • Translation: Late but still.
    • English equivalent: Better late than never.
    • Meaning: "It is better that somebody arrives or something happens later than expected or desired, than not at all."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 25. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 30 June 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 584. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Prázdný klas vysoko hlavu nese.
    • English equivalent: It is not the hen that cackles the most that lay the most eggs.
    • Meaning: It is not the one who advertises for himself the most that can achieve the greatest results.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1169. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Pravdu každý chválí, ale nekaždý ji brání.
    • Translation: All praise the truth yet not everyone defends it.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 282. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Pýcha předchází pád.
    • Translation: Pride preceeds the fall.
    • English equivalent: Pride comes before the fall.
    • Pavel (2010). Investičnístrategie pro třetítisíciletí- 6. přepracovanévydání. Grada Publishing a.s.. p. 50. ISBN 8024733153. 

REdit

  • Ranní ptáče dál doskáče.
    • Translation: An early bird hops farther.
    • English equivalent: The early bird catches the worm.
    • Meaning: Pioneers will get much.
    • Other meaning: Those who get up early in the morning will get much done.
  • Rozděl a panuj.
    • Translation: Divide and rule.
    • English equivalent: Divide and conquer.
    • Meaning: "The best way to conquer or control a group of people is by encouraging them to fight among themselves rather than allowing them to unite in opposition to the ruling authority."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 57. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 13 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "823". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • Ryba smrdí od hlavy.
    • Translation and English equivalent: A fish stinks from the head.
    • Meaning: "A corrupting influence often spreads from a leader to the rest of the organization group."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 90. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
      • Quoted by Ota Šik in Jarní probuzení - a skutečnost: iluze (1989) (p 152 in 1990 reedition): I often phrased it so that the reader could make out who I meant and that - according to a Czech proverb - a fish stinks from the head.

ŘEdit

SEdit

  • S chutí do toho a půl je hotovo.
    • English equivalent: Well begun is half done.
    • Binar, Ivan (1997). Ohrada. Mladá fronta. p. 92. ISBN 9788020406927. 
  • S poctivostí nejdál dojdeš.
    • Translation: With honesty you will get the furthest.
    • English equivalent: Honesty is the best policy.
    • Meaning: "Being honest or telling the truth is always the wisest course of action."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 128. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Jr (2011). Czechmate: From Bohemian Paradise to American Haven. AuthorHouse. p. 53. ISBN 1456714457. 
  • Sám se udává, kdo se bez potřeby vymlová.
    • English equivalent: A guilty conscience needs no accuser.
    • Meaning: "People who know they have done wrong reveal their guilt by the things they say or the way they interpret what other people say."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 112. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "243". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 227. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • Sdílené neštěstí je poloviční neštěstí.
    • English equivalent: Misery loves company.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Ševcona žena chodí bosá.
    • Translation: The wife of the shoemaker walks barefoot.
    • English equivalent: The cobbler's wife is the worst shod.
    • Meaning: "Working hard for others one may neglect one's own needs or the needs of those closest to him."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "7". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Strach má velké oči.
    • Translation: Fear has big eyes.
    • Meaning: People overestimate danger because of fear.
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 228. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Strpení přináší spasení.
    • Closest English equivalent: To love and heaven by suffering we attain.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1151. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Strpení přináší spasení.
    • English equivalent: Paper is forbearing.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1140. ISBN 0415096243. 

ŠEdit

TEdit

  • Tak dlouho se chodí se džbánem pro vodu, až se ucho utrhne.
    • Translation: One goes to fetch water with a jug for so long, until the handle breaks away.
    • English equivalent: The pitcher goes so often to the well that it is broken at last.
    • Meaning: One keeps doing something risky until the risk actually happens.
  • Tichá voda břehy mele.
    • Translation: Silent water grinds the banks.
    • English equivalent: Still water runs deep.
    • Meaning: "Slow but steady work can achieve much." or "That a man says little does not mean that he does not think profoundly."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "78". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 373. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
      • Quoted in Volume 14 of Collected Works of Josef Kajetán Tyl, p 60 (1859): 'But silent water grinds the banks,' the maid butted in, 'and I bet anything that Mr Vencl doesn't go to church so early each Sunday without a cause.'
  • Tĕžko z kamene olej vytlačiti.
    • Translation: You cannot flay a stone.
    • English equivalent: You can't milk a bull.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1040. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tonoucí se i stébla slámy chytá.
    • English equivalent: A drowning man plucks at a straw.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 33. ISBN 0415160502. 

UEdit

VEdit

  • V práci a vědění je naše spasení.
    • Translation: At work and knowledge is our salvation.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 149. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Važ si toho, co máš.
    • English equivalent: Better is the enemy of good.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 166. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Ve vlastní při nikdo soudcem býti nemůže.
    • Translation: No one can be the judge in his own trial.
    • English equivalent: No one can be the judge in his own case.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1038. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Vlas má svůj stín.
    • Translation: The hair has its shadow.
    • English equivalent: Every hair casts its shadow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 4. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Vlk také ctene a znamenane befe.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 641. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Vrána vráně oka nevyklove.
    • English equivalent: Crows do not pick out crow's eyes.
    • Meaning: "One belonging to a group having common interests is not likely to act against or find fault with another member of the same group. Solidarity may prevail over law, justice or truth."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "13". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 96. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 31. ISBN 0415160502. 

ZEdit

  • Z ničeho nebude nic.
    • English equivalent: From nothing nothing can come.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 238. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Závist se po živých ráda vozí.
    • English equivalent: Envy takes no holiday.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 767. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Zdraví je největší poklad.
    • English equivalent: Good health is above wealth.
    • "What shall it profit a man if he gains the whole world – and loses his health?"
    • Dale Carnegie, How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1948)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Zlá huba na šíji neuvízne.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 17. ISBN 0415160502. 

ŽEdit

  • Za nic zas nic koupíš.
    • English equivalent: You can't get something for nothing.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volume 1. Routledge. p. 799. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Zdání klame.
    • Translation: Appearances are deceiving.
    • English equivalent: Never judge by appearances; Judge not a man and things at first sight.
    • Meaning: "Things are not always as they seem, and you can not necessarily trust the evidence of your eyes."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 10. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 18 June 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 713. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Zakázané ovoce chutná nejlépe.
    • Translation: Forbidden fruit tastes best.
    • English equivalent: Forbidden fruit is sweet.
    • Meaning: "Things that you must not have or do are always the most desirable."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 93. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Piska (2008). Anna Marie na vlčím hrádku, aneb konec cudnosti. Tribun EU. p. 83. ISBN 8073994704.