Last modified on 9 April 2014, at 20:41

Christopher Fry

Christopher Fry (December 18, 1907June 30, 2005), born Christopher Harris, in Bristol, was an English playwright. He was awarded the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry in 1962, and the Benson Medal in 2000.

SourcedEdit

  • The moon is nothing
    But a circumambulating aphrodisiac
    Divinely subsidized to provoke the world
    Into a rising birth-rate.
    • Thomas Mendip, in The Lady's Not for Burning, act 3 (1949)
  • Poetry is the language in which man explores his own amazement... says heaven and earth in one word... speaks of himself and his predicament as though for the first time. It has the virtue of being able to say twice as much as prose in half the time, and the drawback, if you do not give it your full attention, of seeming to say half as much in twice the time.
    • Time, New York, April 3, 1950
  • The difference between tragedy and comedy is the difference between experience and intuition. In the experience we strive against every condition of our animal life: against death, against the frustration of ambition, against the instability of human love. In the intuition we trust the arduous eccentricities we're born to, and see the oddness of a creature who has never got acclimatized to being created.
    • "Comedy," Vogue, January 1951
  • Coffee in England is just toasted milk.
    • New York Post, November 29, 1962

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