Last modified on 20 May 2012, at 21:03

Butchers

Butchers are people who may slaughter animals, dress their flesh, sell their meat or any combination of these three tasks. They may prepare standard cuts of meat, poultry, fish and shellfish for sale in retail or wholesale food establishments. A butcher may be employed by supermarkets, grocery stores, butcher shops and fish markets or may be self-employed. An ancient trade, whose duties may date back to the domestication of livestock, butchers formed guilds in England as far back as 1272. Today, many jurisdictions offer trade certifications for butchers. Some areas expect a three-year apprenticeship followed by the option of becoming a master butcher.

SourcedEdit

  • She often spoke of marryin' a butcher or a sausage maker, having a liking for those trades, as she said, for they knew you couldn't never get all the stains from their aprons, and didn't demand it.
    • Gene Wolfe, "Our Neighbor by David Copperfield", Future Tense (1978), ed. Lee Harding; reprinted in Endangered Species (1989).

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical QuotationsEdit

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 87.
  • Whoe'er has gone thro' London street,
    Has seen a butcher gazing at his meat,
    And how he keeps
    Gloating upon a sheep's
    Or bullock's personals, as if his own;
    How he admires his halves
    And quarters—and his calves,
    As if in truth upon his own legs grown.
  • Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh
    And sees fast by a butcher with an axe,
    But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?
  • The butcher in his killing clothes.

External linksEdit

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