Last modified on 24 April 2014, at 21:26

Anne Bradstreet

Anne Bradstreet (ca. 1612 – September 16, 1672) was the first published American woman writer.

SourcedEdit

  • If for thy Father askt, say, thou hadst none;
    And for thy Mother, she alas is poor,
    Which caus'd her thus to send thee out of door.
    • The Author to Her Book
  • What to my Saviour shall I give
    Who freely hath done this for me?
    I'll serve him here whilst I shall live
    And Loue him to Eternity
    • By Night when Others Soundly Slept
  • A Spring returns, and they more youthful made;
    But Man grows old, lies down, remains where once he's laid.
    • Contemplations
  • "Sister," quoth Flesh, "what liv'st thou on
    Nothing but Meditation?
    • The Flesh and the Spirit
  • Such cold mean flowers the spring puts forth betime,
    Before the sun hath thoroughly heat the clime.
    • Of the Four Ages of Man
  • Leave not thy nest, thy dam and sire,
    Fly back and sing amidst this choir.
    • In Reference to her Children, 23 June 1659
  • If ever two were one, then surely we.
    If ever man were loved by wife, then thee;
    If ever wife was happy in a man,
    Compare with me ye women if you can.
    • To my Dear and Loving Husband
  • The principal might yield a greater sum,
    Yet handled ill, amounts but to this crumb;
    • To Her Father with Some Verses

Meditations Divine and Moral (1664)Edit

  • Youth is the time of getting, middle age of improving, and old age of spending.
    • 3
  • Authority without wisdom is like a heavy axe without an edge, fitter to bruise than polish.
    • 12
  • If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant: if we did not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome.
    • 14
  • Fire hath its force abated by water, not by wind; and anger must be allayed by cold words, and not by blustering threats.
    • 43

External linksEdit

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