Akhenaten

How manifold it is, what thou hast made! They are hidden from the face.

Akhenaten, also spelled Akhenaton, Akhnaton, Ikhnaton, or Echnaton (meaning "Effective Spirit of Aten"), and known before the fifth year of his reign as Amenhotep IV (sometimes given its Greek form, Amenophis IV, meaning "Amun is Satisfied"), was a Pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt, who ruled for 17 years and died in 1336 BC or 1334 BC. He is especially noted for abandoning traditional Egyptian polytheism and introducing worship centered on the Aten, which is sometimes described as monotheistic or henotheistic. Later official language avoids calling the Aten a god, giving the solar deity a status above mere gods.

QuotesEdit

Thou bringest forth as thou desirest
To maintain the people
According as thou madest them for thyself,
The lord of all of them, wearying with them,
The lord of every land, rising for them,
The Aton of the day, great of majesty.
  • How manifold it is, what thou hast made!
    They are hidden from the face.
    O sole god, like whom there is no other!
    Thou didst create the world according to thy desire,
    Whilst thou wert alone: All men, cattle, and wild beasts,
    Whatever is on earth, going upon feet,
    And what is on high, flying with its wings.
    • Great Hymn to the Aten, as translated in The Ancient Near East, Vol. 1 : An Anthology of Texts and Pictures (1958) by James B. Pritchard, p. 227
  • Everyone has his food, and his time of life is reckoned.
    Their tongues are separate in speech,
    And their natures as well;
    Their skins are distinguished,
    As thou distinguishest the foreign peoples.
    Thou makest a Nile in the underworld,
    Thou bringest forth as thou desirest
    To maintain the people
    According as thou madest them for thyself,
    The lord of all of them, wearying with them,
    The lord of every land, rising for them,
    The Aton of the day, great of majesty.
    • Great Hymn to the Aten, as translated in The Ancient Near East, Vol. 1 : An Anthology of Texts and Pictures (1958) by James B. Pritchard, p. 227

External linksEdit

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Last modified on 8 April 2014, at 23:29