Last modified on 5 October 2014, at 14:31

African proverbs

Proverbs from all of Africa.

BEdit

DEdit

  • Don't look where you fell, but where you slipped.
    • English equivalent: Today is yesterday's pupil.
    • Sr, Neil, Neil, Neal (2011). Police Instructor: Deliver Dynamic Presentations, Create Engaging Slides, \& Increase Active Learning. CreateSpace. p. 245. ISBN 1. 
  • Don’t set sail using someone else’s star.

EEdit

  • Every morning in Africa, a gazelle wakes up.
    It knows it must run faster than the fastest lion or it will be killed.
    Every morning a lion wakes up.
    It knows it must outrun the slowest gazelle or it will starve to death.
    It doesn't matter whether you are a lion or a gazelle.
    When the sun comes up, you better start running.
    • Thomas L. Friedman, The World Is Flat (2005–2006), Ch. 2, Flattener #6 (p. 137 in the 2006 edition)

IEdit

  • If one knows thee not or a blind man scolds thee, do not become angry.
    • Anonymous (claimed to be an African proverb by The Journal of Negro History, Volume I. Jan. 1916[1])
  • It takes a whole village to raise a child.
    • Popularized in English by Hillary Clinton's 1996 book, It Takes a Village. Although sayings with similar purport are found in various African cultures, the authenticity of this expression's African origin is debatable.[2][3]
  • It is a bad child who does not take advice.
    • English equivalent: Advice most needed is the least heeded.
    • Stone (2006). Routledge Dictionary of World Proverbs. Taylor \& Francis. p. 8. 

OEdit

SEdit

TEdit

  • The sun is the king of torches.
    • West African proverb, quoted in Proverbs, Maxims and Phrases of All Ages : Classified Subjectively and Arranged Alphabetically (1887) by Robert Christy, p. 322
  • Tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today.
    • Prospectus, Goldman (2011). Baseball Prospectus 2011. John Wiley \& Sons. p. 496. ISBN 0470622067. 

YEdit

  • You condemn on hearsay evidence alone, your sins increase.
    • Latin equivalent: When in doubt, in favour of the accused.
    • Anonymous quoted in Apropos of Africa : Sentiments of Negro American Leaders on Africa from the 1800s to the 1950s (1969) edited by Adelaide Cromwell Hill and Martin Kilson

See alsoEdit