Last modified on 8 April 2014, at 22:37

Abraham Maslow

Abraham Harold Maslow (April 1, 1908June 8, 1970) was an American psychologist who pioneered humanistic psychology and developed ideas related to a hierarchy of needs.

QuotesEdit

Does health mean being symptom-free? I deny it.
I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.
Education is learning to grow, learning what to grow toward, learning what is good and bad, learning what is desirable and undesirable, learning what to choose and what not to choose.
What is necessary to change a person is to change his awareness of himself.
A musician must make music, an artist must paint, a poet must write, if he is to be ultimately at peace with himself. What a man can be, he must be.
  • Human beings seem to be far more autonomous and self-governed than modern psychological theory allows for.
    • Motivation and Personality (1954), p. 123
  • The study of crippled, stunted, immature, and unhealthy specimens can yield only a cripple psychology and a cripple philosophy. The study of self-actualizing people must be the basis for a more universal science of psychology
    • Motivation and Personality (1954), p. 234
  • I am deliberately rejecting our present easy distinction between sickness and health, at least as far as surface symptoms are concerned. Does sickness mean having symptoms? I maintain now that sickness might consist of not having symptoms when you should. Does health mean being symptom-free? I deny it. Which of the Nazis at Auschwitz or Dachau were healthy? Those with a stricken conscience or those with a nice, clear, happy conscience? Was it possible for a profoundly human person not to feel conflict, suffering, depression, rage, etc.?
    In a word if you tell me you have a personality problem, I am not certain until I know you better whether to say "Good" or "I'm sorry". It depends on the reasons. And these, it seems, may be bad reasons, or they may be good reasons.
    An example is the changing attitude of psychologists toward popularity, toward adjustment, even toward delinquency. Popular with whom? Perhaps it is better for a youngster to be unpopular with the neighboring snobs or with the local country club set. Adjusted to what? To a bad culture? To a dominating parent? What shall we think of a well-adjusted slave? A well-adjusted prisoner? Even the behavior problem boy is being looked upon with new tolerance. Why is he delinquent? Most often it is for sick reasons. But occasionally it is for good reasons and the boy is simply resisting exploitation, domination, neglect, contempt, and trampling upon. Clearly what will be called personality problems depends on who is doing the calling. The slave owner? The dictator? The patriarchal father? The husband who wants his wife to remain a child? It seems quite clear that personality problems may sometimes be loud protests against the crushing of one's psychological bones, of one's true inner nature.
    • "Personality Problems and Personality Growth", an essay in, The Self : Explorations in Personal Growth (1956) by Clark E. Moustakas, p. 237, later published in Notes Toward A Psychology of Being (1962)
  • The best product should be bought, the best man should be rewarded more. Interfering factors which befuddle this triumph of virtue, justice, truth, and efficiency, etc., should be kept to an absolute minimum or should approach zero as a limit.
    • Eupsychian Management : A Journal (1965), p. 212
  • If swindling pays, then it will not stop. The definition of the good society is one in which virtue pays. I can now add a slight variation on this; you cannot have a good society unless virtue pays. But here we get very close to the whole subject of metaneeds, and also of the ideal conditions where dichotomies are resolved and transcended.
    • Eupsychian Management : A Journal (1965), p. 213
  • I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.
    • The Psychology of Science: A Reconnaissance (1966), Ch. 2, p. 15 ; although some similar statements to describe fundamental errors in human perception have been attributed to others, his expression, or slight paraphrases of it, is one of the earliest yet found to be documented in published writings, and remains among the most popular.
  • Education is learning to grow, learning what to grow toward, learning what is good and bad, learning what is desirable and undesirable, learning what to choose and what not to choose.
    • The Farther Reaches of Human Nature (1971)
  • What is necessary to change a person is to change his awareness of himself.
    • As quoted in Life In the Open Sea (1972) by William M. Stephens, p. 21
  • The story of the human race is the story of men and women selling themselves short.
    • As quoted in Road Signs for Success (1993) by Jim Whitt, p. 61
  • Laugh at what you hold sacred, and still hold it sacred.
    • As quoted in Relax — You May Have Only a Few Minutes Left : Using the Power of Humor to Overcome Stress in Your Life and Work (1998) by Loretta LaRoche, p. xvii
  • If you plan on being anything less than you are capable of being, you will probably be unhappy all the days of your life.
    • As quoted in Perfecting Private Practice (2004) by Joan Neehall-Davidson, p. 95
  • The way to recover the meaning of life and the worthwhileness of life is to recover the power of experience, to have impulse voices from within, and to be able to hear these impulse voices from within — and make the point: This can be done.
    • As quoted in The Meaning of Life : According to the Great and the Good (2007) edited by Richard T. Kinnier
  • You will either step forward into growth, or you will step backward into safety.
    • As quoted in How the Best Leaders Lead : Proven Secrets to Getting the Most Out of Yourself and Others (2010) by Brian Tracy, p. 35

Motivation and Personality (1954)Edit

One of the goals of education should be to teach that life is precious.
  • For our chronically and extremely hungry man, Utopia can be defined simply as a place where there is plenty of food. He tends to think that, if only he is guaranteed food for the rest of his life, he will be perfectly happy and will never want anything more. Life itself tends to be defined in terms of eating. Freedom, love, community feeling, respect, philosophy, may all be waved aside as fripperies that are useless since they fail to fill the stomach. Such a man may fairly be said to live by bread alone. It cannot possibly be denied that such things are true, but their generality can be denied. Emergency conditions are, almost by definition, rare in the normally functioning peaceful society.
    • p. 17
  • Secrecy, censorship, dishonesty, and blocking of communication threaten all the basic needs.
    • p. 23
  • The good or healthy society would then be defined as one that permitted people's highest purposes to emerge by satisfying all their basic needs.
    • p. 31
  • A musician must make music, an artist must paint, a poet must write, if he is to be ultimately at peace with himself. What a man can be, he must be. This need we may call self-actualization. This term, first coined by Kurt Goldstein, is being used in this paper in a much more specific and limited fashion. It refers to the desire for self-fulfillment, namely, to the tendency for him to become actualized in what he is potentially. This tendency might be phrased as the desire to become more and more what one is, to become everything that one is capable of becoming.
  • Love, safety, belongingness and respect from other people are almost panaceas for the situational disturbances and even for some of the mild character disturbances.
    • p. 103
  • One of the goals of education should be to teach that life is precious.
    • p. 255

External linksEdit

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about: